Coming of Age - 成人式

Within the different culture, some of us celebrate the coming of age.  In the United States it’s called “sweet 16”, in some latin culture it’s called “Quinceañera”, and much more.  But specifically, in Japan, it is called “Seijin-no-Hi”.  This started nearly 1200 years ago to recognize the belief that once an individual turns 20 they become mature and shall be contributing to the society as a member.

In Japanese culture of coming of age, it is celebrated not individually, but by the community, the society, and as tradition.  What I mean is that individuals do not celebrate their 20th birthday on their actual birthday, but depending on their year that they will or have turned 20, that is when they celebrate.  Thus, on the second Monday of January every year, they will dress up in their finest traditional attire and attend a ceremony in the local city offices receiving gifts.  Then, after the ceremony, the individuals can go “hang out” with their friends/family.

With such sponsorship and number of existing Japanese communities in Southern California, fortunately, my family and I were able to attend this sacred ceremony to properly become Seijin.  As we approach my sister’s 20’s birthday, I wanted to dedicate this blog about her Seijinsiki.

My sister and I are those typical sisters who fight and argues ALOT about small/insignificant things.  A lot of times, we headbutt because our value and belief don’t align with each other, and as sisters, we get stubborn about it too.  However, through our journey together for 20 years, we have overcome our challenges/struggles and grew together.  And I am proud for that.  I know that she will do great things and accomplish much more.

 

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